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Weekly Roundup

Weekly Roundup

Weekly Roundup: New Year, New Inspiration

January 7, 2018
Weekly Roundup

Happy New Year! The Weekly Roundup has been on hiatus the last two weeks, but it’s back today with some inspiring reads for your Sunday.

This week’s Weekly Roundup features some thought-provoking pieces for working moms and insightful posts on motherhood.

In Case You Missed It: Each week I link back to my own posts from the previous week. You can find them filed below under ICYMI.

Did you come across an interesting piece about work, life, or motherhood this week? Feel free to share in the comments or on social media. My links are at the top right of the page.

Thanks for reading!

The Roundup

Motherhood

Working Moms

If You Want Women to Move Up, You Have to Accommodate Mothers by Rebecca Johnson for The Wall Street Journal.

Why You Should Read: You may have seen the tweet that went viral recently after a mom brought her 6-month-old baby to a conference. Her remarks sparked a discussion about what it means to accommodate parents–particularly mothers–at work. 

This article is her follow-up to that discussion and offers an important argument about the need for employer/cultural advancements to accommodate mothers at work.

4 Tips for Spending One-on-One Time with Each Child by Lori Mihalich-Levin for Mindful Return.

Why You Should Read: Lori Mihalich-Levin always offers such wonderful guidance for working moms, and I love this piece because her tips can translate just as well to stay-at-home moms.

The post offers great advice for how to make the most of one-on-one time spent with each child when you have multiple children, and also provides reassurance to moms who may worry that they may be shortchanging their kids. Check it out!

This is what work-life balance looks like at a company with 100% retention of moms by Jenny Anderson for Quartz at Work.

Why You Should Read: This article about Patagonia’s working moms retention rate has been circulating the web for awhile, but it is still a relevant and timely piece. 

The article details a great example of an employer that values its workers and proves that a business can be profitable while also providing real value to its working parents.

10 Parenting Books I Wish I Knew About Before Going Back To Work by Jennifer Mayer for Fairygodboss.

Why You Should Read: This article lists 10 “books that help in micro and macro ways to prepare and support working new moms in their careers.” It includes some that I’ve never heard of that others may not have heard of as well, which is great if you are looking for an empowering new book to read. It also includes a blog favorite – Back To Work After Baby by Lori Mihalich-Levin.

That Toxic Coworker Could Be Impacting Your Relationship With Your Kids by Alex Wilson for Fairygodboss.

Why You Should Read: This article from Fairygodboss discusses how toxic relationships at work can follow you home. I find it interesting since I’ve observed the same in my employment discrimination practice.

When assessing a client’s level of emotional distress in a case, we always find a negative effect on family relationships. This piece doesn’t specifically delve into discrimination, but it does show how workplace stressors can follow you home.

An important read if you are interested in combatting this problem!

Motherhood

10 REAL GOALS FOR REAL MOMS TO SET FOR THE NEW YEAR by Perfection Pending.

Why You Should Read: This piece offers some great advice for how moms can better care for themselves this year. You don’t have to be a ‘resolutioner’ to strive be kinder to yourself, and this post shares some simple ways to do so.

The Evolution of Motherhood written by me and republished on Reality Moms.

Why You Should Read: This was a post I originally wrote for the blog here. It was republished on Reality Moms this week. In it, I discuss the gradual evolution of a first-time mom. Even though you may *literally* become a mother overnight, sometimes it takes a little longer to actually feel like a “real” mom.

If you missed it the first time around, now is a great time to check it out. 

Two is Not Terrible written by me and republished on Her View From Home.

Why You Should Read: This is another piece that I originally wrote for the blog that was republished this week. In it, I discuss the joys of having a two-year-old, and share the things I’ve so loved about having a little one this age.

If you’re looking for something to combat tales of the “terrible twos,” check out “Two is Not Terrible” on Her View From Home!

The Best Thing To Say To A Mom Of Young Kids by Janie Porter for Scary Mommy.

Why You Should Read: This post is a nice counter to the stories of things people usually say to parents of young kids.

My favorite line: “Thank you for reminding me that I am lucky. Thank you for reminding me that I need to live in gratitude for every single day that I have with these kids. Yes, there are a lot of them, but I am happy about that in every single way imaginable.”

ICYMI

9 Ways to Pamper Yourself at Home this Winter

12 New Year’s Resolutions Your Toddler Won’t Be Making This Year

Weekly Roundup

Weekly Roundup: Watching Our Children Grow

December 17, 2017
children grow

Each week I share my favorite pieces from around the web along with noteworthy news items relevant to readers.

This week’s Roundup is all about the little ones–our kids–from preemies to the all grown-up kind. Scroll down for the full Roundup!

In Case You Missed It: Each week I’ll link back to my own blog posts from the previous week. You can find them filed below under ICYMI.

Finally, a big THANK YOU to all who read my Back to Work After Baby book review and entered the giveaway. The winner has been notified.

Even if you did not win, be sure to visit Mindful Return for your daily dose of working mama inspiration, and consider picking up a copy of Back To Work After Baby!

Thanks for reading!

The Roundup

children grow

Children

What They Don’t Tell You About Enjoying Every Moment With Your Kids by Kathy Radigan for HuffPost Parents.

Why You Should Read: This piece beautifully captures the passage of time with young children. The days can be so exhausting that you may at times wish the time away. But, at the same time, the moments with our young children are sacred and beautiful and of course pass much too quickly.

My favorite line: “What people didn’t tell me was that as the years go by, the harder, scarier days get fuzzier, and the sweeter days grow dearer. I cherish my memories of the amazing, crazy, messy and even awful days of raising my kids when they were younger. And I look forward to making more as they continue to grow.”

Are you Returning to Work with a Baby in the NICU? by Amialya (Mia) Durairaj for Mindful Return.

Why You Should Read: This guest post for Mindful Return gives great advice to preemie parents who are struggling to balance career and the NICU.

A snippet from the piece: “Set Boundaries at Work . . . On my first day back, I wrote an email to my coworkers requesting that they kindly refrain from asking about my twins’ status so that I could focus on my job. And guess what? Everyone took the hint. It helped me retain some semblance of professionalism during a rough time.” Read and share with a NICU parent you know!

Watching My Toddler Grow Is Joyful and Painful written by me for Parent Co.

Why You Should Read: This piece is a finalist in Parent Co.’s December Writing Contest. The contest theme is “growth” and my article details the bittersweetness of watching our babies grow and become more independent seemingly overnight. It’s joyful. It’s painful. And it all happens so fast. I hope you’ll give it a read!

How To Be A Success In The Eyes Of Your Two-Year-Old written by me for Fairygodboss.

Why You Should Read: Yes, I have included myself twice in this Roundup! Both articles went live this week, and I am proud of them because in each, I drew inspiration from my favorite little muse–my two-and-a-half year old son! As every mom knows, parenting a 2-year-old can be a challenge. But, for all the challenges, there is so much good, and there’s actually a lot our little people can teach us about life. 

Tip #8 from the article – Treat Yourself: “Two-year-olds don’t think twice about partaking in the foods and activities they enjoy. They haven’t been conditioned to feel guilty about occasional indulgences.

Toddlers treat themselves like it’s their job. A two-year-old doesn’t apologize for having a milkshake at lunch. He doesn’t question the fact that you take him to spend two hours playing inside a bouncy castle.

Live like a two-year-old and relish your occasional indulgences. Enjoy the facial. Don’t worry about how the fort is holding up while you’re away. Have the birthday cake without complaining about how you ‘shouldn’t.’ Just own it.” I hope you’ll give it a read!

Last call for one more child by Daisy Alpert Florin for Motherwell.

Why You Should Read: Like Kathy Radigan’s piece, this article also discusses how quickly our children grow and what happens when they are older, but it does so from a different angle, asking: what do you do when your kids are grown, but you want more? How do you know when you’re done having children for good?

From the post: “What surprises me is that the very thing I craved for so long when the children were small and seemingly always underfoot—space and time away from them—is exactly what frightens me now. In the mornings, when my kids are at school, I vacillate between being thrilled at having the whole house to myself and terrified of being alone.” Give it a read!

ICYMI

What I Learned From a Postpartum Trip to Washington

10 Tips For a Happier First Day Back From Maternity Leave

Watching My Toddler Grow is Joyful and Painful

Did you come across an interesting piece about work, life, or motherhood this week? Feel free to share in the comments or on social media. My links are at the top right of the page.

Weekly Roundup

Weekly Roundup: Navigating Motherhood

December 10, 2017
Weekly Roundup

Each week I share my favorite pieces from around the web along with noteworthy news items relevant to readers.

This week’s Weekly Roundup features some great posts on navigating motherhood–our relationships with other moms as well as those with our children. There are also a few pieces acknowledging the struggles working moms face. 

**If you haven’t yet read my review of Back To Work After Baby or entered the book giveaway, you can do so HERE. The giveaway ends at 12 AM on December 16th.**

In Case You Missed It: Each week I’ll link back to my own posts from the previous week. You can find them filed below under ICYMI.

Did you come across an interesting piece about work, life, or motherhood this week? Feel free to share in the comments or on social media. My links are at the top right of the page.

Thanks for reading!

The Roundup

Weekly Roundup

Motherhood

An Ode To The Mom Nod by Alison Tedford for Sparkly Shoes and Sweat Drops.

Why You Should Read: Solidarity. Sisterhood. Saving you from an otherwise horrifically awkward moment in Target. These are some of the wonderful benefits of the “mom nod,” and Alison Tedford does a great job illustrating just why this little gesture between moms is so important.

My favorite part of the piece: “There’s something powerful about being truly seen in a moment of vulnerability and being acknowledged with support in the sisterhood of motherhood. There’s validation that comes when you’re completely mortified and wishing you were invisible and someone stops to let you know they see you and this, too, shall pass.” YES.

THIS IS WHAT MOMS MEAN WHEN THEY SAY “CHERISH EVERY MOMENT.” by Katie Bingham Smith for Grown and Flown.

Why You Should Read: If you’re a parent of young children, this post will make you want to hug them extra close and just soak in their innocence a little longer. And if you’re an experienced parent, this post will make you feel seen and heard. 

Or, as the article puts it: “What they were trying to convey was to enjoy their innocence–it’s fleeting. Be happy that your biggest worry is they might wet their pants in school. Soothing a teething child, or dragging them out of a store for causing a scene is nothing compared to what lies ahead.”

Why I Regret Becoming A Stay-At-Home Mom by Molly England for The Huffington Post.

Why You Should Read: Molly England’s piece is an ode to the sacrifices we make as mothers and proof that the progress we make as moms and humans is not linear. Our choices may change from day-to-day and from year-to-year. Our past doesn’t have to define our future, and our desire to make different choices as mothers does not mean we regret motherhood itself.

Working Moms

Women–even CEOs–still can’t win when it comes to maternity leave by Georgene Huang for Forbes.

Why You Should Read: Georgene Huang’s piece discusses the difficulties even powerful women face when it comes to maternity leave. The issues women CEOs encounter are different from the challenges the average female worker faces, and different still from the experiences of male CEOs. Her perspective is interesting and offers insight into the double-bind these women experience.

To the Working Mama Who Feels Like She’s a “Bad Mom” by Lori Mihalich-Levin for Mindful Return.

Why You Should Read: As always, Lori Mihalich-Levin dispenses sage, practical advice for the working mama who may be struggling with her dual identities as mother and professional. In this piece, she discusses the historical reliance on “alloparents.” According to her post, alloparents are those with whom we share the caregiving workload–relatives and other trusted adults–and they have been critical to raising children throughout human history, a fact rarely mentioned in the usual discussion about mothers in the workplace. Check it out!

Teaching kids that women can work and be moms at the same time by K.C. Willivee for Motherwell.

Why You Should Read: This article hits on how difficult it can be to strike the right balance when trying to model our values for our children. Whether you are a working mother or stay-at-home mom, this piece will very likely speak to you.

ICYMI

Book Review and Giveaway: Back To Work After Baby

What You Need to Know About New York Paid Family Leave

A Letter To My Two-Year-Old: I’ll Always Remember 2

The Secret Behind Moms Who Do it All

Weekly Roundup

Weekly Roundup: Career Inspo and Empowering Mothers

December 3, 2017
Weekly Roundup

Each week I share my favorite pieces from around the web along with noteworthy news items relevant to readers.

This week’s Weekly Roundup features some great career tips, advice for working mamas, and some pieces on motherhood that will tug at your heartstrings.

I also share a piece I wrote for Literary Mama that was published this week: Chasing My Autumns.

Scroll down for the full roundup!

In Case You Missed It: Each week I’ll link back to my own posts from the previous week. You can find them filed below under ICYMI.

Did you come across an interesting piece about work, life, or motherhood this week? Feel free to share in the comments or on social media. My links are at the top right of the page.

Thanks for reading!

The Roundup

Weekly Roundup

Working Moms

Why You Need More Career Support During Your Pregnancy Than You Think by Georgene Huang for Forbes.

Why You Should Read: The article offers helpful, supportive tips for navigating pregnancy and maternity leave. It also offers reassurance regarding the emotional aspects of becoming a new parent and navigating the return to the workplace.

My favorite piece of advice: “Don’t get your heart set on achieving too many goals while you’re on maternity leave. Despite your best intentions, you don’t know if you can be available, especially if you’ve never had a child before.”

7 Salary Negotiation Tips for Working Mamas by Lori Mihalich-Levin for Mindful Return.

Why You Should Read: As always, Lori provides practical tips to help working moms live their best life. In this post, she addresses the inadequacies frequently felt by working mothers when they return to work after having a baby, and offers insight into how to get past those feelings. She then lists seven tips for approaching salary negotiations within this context. Very helpful if you’ll soon find yourself returning to work or entering negotiations. 

Motherhood

Chasing My Autumns – written by me for Literary Mama’s After Page One.

Why You Should Read: In this piece, I share my reasons for choosing to write again after becoming a lawyer and a mother. If you’re looking for some writing inspiration or are curious to know why I take to the keyboard each day, check out Chasing My Autumns!

New Parents – You Can’t Possibly Know by Amy Betters-Midtvidt for Her View From Home.

Why You Should Read: This piece tugs at the heartstrings. As a mom to a toddler, there’s so much I’ve learned and experienced, but there’s also so much I’ve yet to learn, and reading this piece reminded me that there is still so much to look forward to and to learn down the road. It truly captures the bittersweetness of parenting and watching a child grow.

Parenting

5 Kid Behaviors Adults Could Learn to Do Better by Cheryl Maguire for Parent Co.

Why You Should Read: I recently wrote an upcoming piece for Fairygodboss regarding the lessons we could learn from our 2-year-olds, and this article strikes a similar chord. For as much as we try to teach our children about life, there is so much they can teach us–and this article does a nice job showing that. 

Why I want to make their childhood magical by Colleen Temple for Motherly.

Why You Should Read: This is another feel-good piece that makes you appreciate the beauty of childhood. It describes the value in participating in the activities that may seem too messy or complicated to undertake, but are so valuable in creating cherished memories and happiness for our children.

One super-relatable example from the article: “It’s so worth watching my children’s face light up every time they see the dinosaurs at the museum. Even if a complete meltdown just happened over getting into the stroller to go into the museum twenty minutes prior.”

Career

My Mentor Helped Me Get Promoted — And Yours Can, Too! by The Feminist Financier for Fairygodboss.

Why You Should Read: I’ve written before about the importance of finding a great mentor early in your career, so I enjoyed reading The Feminist Financier’s take on how her mentor helped advance her career. Not only does the piece discuss the success she found with her mentor’s help, but it also gives the reader practical takeaways to achieve their own goals. Definitely worth the read!

10 Ways To Promote Yourself — Without Bragging by Fairygodboss.

Why You Should Read: As this piece states, “research shows that women are more inhibited when it comes to self-promotion compared to men” and at the same time “unfair promotion practices are one of the top gender equality issues women face at work.” As such, this article sets forth several ways women can speak positively about themselves without coming across as cocky or tactless. Some great advice to follow if you are looking for ways to set yourself apart at work.

ICYMI

11 Powerful Monday Mantras to Supercharge your Day

Growing into Motherhood

The 5 Things You’ll Forget as a New Mom

 

Weekly Roundup

Weekly Roundup: Giving Thanks

November 26, 2017
Weekly Roundup

Each week I share my favorite pieces from around the web along with noteworthy news items relevant to readers.

In keeping with the spirit of giving thanks, this week’s Weekly Roundup includes some great pieces on gratitude. There is also an insightful post on self-care that made its rounds around the web this week (for good reason!).

As always, there are also some great pieces for working parents, including a post from Baby Caravan, LLC explaining what to expect when New York’s Paid Family Leave takes effect on January 1st.

I also share my latest for Fairygodboss: 6 Qualities Of People Who Are Confident — But Not Cocky.

Scroll down for the full roundup!

In Case You Missed It: Each week I’ll link back to my own posts from the previous week. You can find them filed below under ICYMI.

Did you come across an interesting piece about work, life, or motherhood this week? Feel free to share in the comments or on social media. My links are at the top right of the page.

Thanks for reading!

The Roundup

Weekly Roundup

Gratitude

6 simple ways to be a thankful mom by Amy Alpert for Motherly.

Why You Should Read: This piece lists some great, practical ways to practice gratitude even when you may not be feeling particularly grateful. It suggests tips such as playing the “aren’t we lucky” game, which is great advice for days that feel like years. My favorite line: “Gratitude is a pathway to mindfulness because it puts you squarely in the present.”

11 simple ways to teach children gratitude by Christina Clemer for Motherly.

Why You Should Read: This is another great article that discusses ways to instill gratitude with the focus being on raising thankful kids. My son is still young, but I think often about how I’d like to raise him with a sense of gratitude and an appreciation for the life he has. The piece gives great tips such as “set expectations” when you’re shopping (not every trip will yield a new toy) and “give experiences” to reduce reliance on material possessions. Great advice for this month and the whole year!

Self-Care

This Is What ‘Self-Care’ REALLY Means, Because It’s Not All Salt Baths And Chocolate Cake by Brianna West for Thought Catalog.

Why You Should Read: Chances are, you’ve seen this article circulating in your newsfeed this week, and it’s for good reason. In a culture that is obsessed with the presentation, maintenance, and care of self, there’s a lot of confusion about what it actually means to engage in self-care. As Ms. West writes, “it’s not all salt baths and chocolate cake.” It’s not pretty Instagram filters, candles, and treating yourself. True self-care is self-preservation in its rawest sense: it’s learning to say no–to others, to yourself, to your indulgences. It’s living responsibly and creating a life you don’t need to “escape from.” A great read!

Working Parents

HOW DOES NEW YORK STATE’S PAID FAMILY LEAVE WORK? by Baby Caravan.

Why You Should Read: If you live in New York and aren’t clear on what to expect under the paid family leave laws taking effect January 1st, Baby Caravan’s piece lays it all out in plain English. In the upcoming month, I will be sharing additional resources to help you navigate the paid family leave landscape, and Baby Caravan’s post is a great place to start!

4 Ways Working Mothers Balance Career and Family by Alexis Lupo for Career Contessa.

Why You Should Read: This article tackles the reality of what it takes to successfully balance career and motherhood. As the article mentions, juggling a career and motherhood often requires a reassessment of priorities and redefining what success means to you. The piece gives great tips like “do what feels right” and “stop trying to find work-life balance.”

The lessons here are similar to the ones in the self-care piece cited above. Succeeding as a working mother and caring for yourself both involve a degree of shaking off societal expectations and making choices that are truly right for your well-being–even if those choices don’t fit the script you think you’re supposed to follow.

Professionalism

6 Qualities Of People Who Are Confident — But Not Cocky – my latest for Fairygodboss.

Why You Should Read: In this piece, I share my thoughts on the six qualities that set confident people apart from their cocky counterparts. Confidence is key to getting ahead and reaching your goals, but many people (especially women) are afraid of appearing too confident for fear of seeming brash or arrogant. However, there are simple ways to distinguish the two. Read on to see if you agree with my take on things!

ICYMI

9 Small Luxuries I’m Thankful for as a Mom

11 Questions: Lori Mihalich-Levin of Mindful Return

The Ten Commandments of Parenting Toddlers

5 Tips for Staying Motivated as a Working Parent